Energy Day slides

The slides from the 6th Oxford Energy Day on Energy in Growing Economies are now available for download

2 Oct: Energy in Growing Economies

Oxford Energy Day

2 October 2017, Maths Institute

Energy in Growing Economies

According to BP’s 2017 Energy Outlook, energy use in non-OECD countries is expected to increase by some 50%  and make up over two-thirds of global energy consumption by 2035.  This is lifting billions out of poverty, and underwriting the achievement of the millennium goals. How this increase is achieved, and whether it can be accelerated, is not only of interest for OECD countries. Opportunities to develop new models for providing energy uninhibited by existing infrastructure may provide lessons for others.

This event will bring together international speakers to discuss challenges and opportunities for growing economies.

Details

Colloquia

Colloquia are held on Tuesdays at 5pm during term time and will be posted here.

Slides are available for download

Mainsteam event

Over 50 energy enthusiasts from across the University met with Mainstream RP – a leader in the delivery of wind and solar installations worldwide, includingSouth Africa, Chile and Vietnam. In an afternoon of simulating lectures they learned about the entire chain from planning, to construction and operation.

 

Colloquia slides

The slides from our exciting series of speakers is now available for download. Speakers covered many of the future technologies, from PV to tidal, as well as major policy issues (such as how to get the ear of No 10).

2016/17 New Energy Systems Thinkers programme announced

This term the Energy Network is running a series of introductory lectures on energy issues at the Oxford Martin School. The talks are aimed at postgraduate students but they are open to the wider University community. Topics covered include: energy and development, the carbon problem, energy economics, wind and tidal power and storage. For more information on the talks visit the New Energy Systems Thinkers (NEST) website. Register to attend the talks here.

Michaelmas talks announced

The Michaelmas Energy Colloquia series commences on 11 October with a talk by Lord Oxburgh on CCS. This term the talks cover some of the key topics in the energy field, including: tidal power; redox flow batteries; nuclear energy; the built environment and storage. More more information on the talks visit the events page.

All talks take place on Tuesdays at 5pm during term time in the School of Geography and the Environment.

Chris Llewellyn Smith addresses the elephants in the room at Oxford Alumni Weekend

Can Future Energy Needs be Met Sustainably?

This was the question posed by Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith at the Oxford Alumni Weekend. You can view his presentation here.

5th Oxford Energy Conference report

Energy Systems logo

The annual Oxford Energy Conference took place at the Mathematics Institute on 13 June. This year the conference focussed on Energy Systems including electricity, transport and heat.

Discussions on energy tend to focus on electricity and transport. Heat is often neglected, although globally as much primary energy is used to provide heat as electricity. Decarbonising heat alongside the likely electrification of transport will have a major impact on electricity demand. Meanwhile, electrity supply, distribution and markets will have to accommodate increasingly diversified sources (many intermittent) and changing demands. Better understanding of the whole system (customer engagement, demand, heat, transport, electricity supply and distribution) is required and was discussed at the conference.

For a report on the day, and to view the speaker presentations, visit the conference page.

Masters students get up close to renewable technology during field trip to Wales

Masters students on the Environmental Change and Management course at the Environmental Change Institute visited mid-Wales recently for a field trip focused on renewable energy. Staying at the Centre for Alternative Technology, they lived entirely off-grid, relying on micro-hydro, solar, biomass and wind for their electricity and heating. Trips to a nearby wind farm and hydro power plant gave them experience of renewable generation at a larger scale. You can read one student’s thoughts on the trip here.

For more information about the programme visit the ECM website.

Henry Snaith named one of top scientific minds of 2015

SnaithHenry Snaith has been named the second most influential scientific mind of 2015 by Thomson Reuters.

According to Thomson Reuters’ research performance data, Snaith authored 24 ‘hot’ papers that were highly cited in 2013-14, demonstrating their significance to the scientific community. The accolade is due to Snaith’s work on perovskite solar cells.

You can read more about perovskites on our solar pages and in our solar case study.

The full report from Thomson Reuters can be found here.

Dr Philipp Grunewald appears before Energy and Climate Change Committee

Dr Philipp Grunewald, Deputy Director for Energy Research at Oxford, gave expert opinion to the Energy and Climate Change Committee as part of their enquiry into low carbon network infrastructure this week.

You can watch the full session on ParliamentLive.

Phil evidence “If a system is in steady state it’s quite good to have experts on individual technologies and to try and tease efficiency out of one technology will usually help the system. But we’re not dealing with a system in steady state; it’s undergoing a pretty fundamental transition, and when a system undergoes such transition what you need is system thinkers who understand how the components fit together.”

 

Oxford Energy Newsletter – winter 2015

Read more about the University of Oxford’s current energy research.

Successful fourth Oxford Energy Conference

The fourth annual Oxford Energy Conference was held on 5 October at the Maths Institute. This year the focus was on ‘Integrating Renewables’.

Experts from the University, the UK and Europe converged on Oxford to discuss the challenges and opportunities of integrating renewables. The event was also the launch of the Oxford Martin Programme on Integrating Renewable Energy, a new research programme on managing global commons. To view the speakers’ slides and to hear more about the day visit the conference website.

Oxford Energy Conference 5th October: Integrating Renewables

For more information and to register, please visit our website.

Potential of RenewablesElements of Solutions

SynthesisOvercoming2

Registration is now open for the fourth annual Oxford Energy Conference. This year the theme is ‘Integrating Renewables’.

The costs of renewables are falling rapidly. In many countries their growing contributions have begun to have profound impacts on the wider system. Conventional generators, markets and network and system operators are all affected.

This one-day conference will address the opportunities and challenges of integrating renewables. Leading thinkers from Oxford, the UK and abroad will share their knowledge and discuss measures that will be needed to meet the challenges, including storage, smart grids and demand-side measures, and the re-design of markets that will be needed to deliver an effective solution.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Monday 5th October, 9:30 – 18:00
The Mathematics Institute, Oxford
 www.energy.ox.ac.uk/conference

Smart Metering Early Learning Project

darby15Smart electricity and gas meters with the offer of an in-home display are due to be rolled out to all households in Great Britain by the end of 2020. DECC commissioned this synthesis research as part of its work to support a successful smart metering implementation programme (the Programme), to offer an initial analysis of progress to date and to learn how householders can best be engaged in order to benefit from the roll-out, in particular by saving energy. This report summarises and analyses evidence from a range of sources, including three new DECC research projects into how GB householders engage with smart metering, GB and international evidence on smart metering and energy feedback, and evidence from public health behaviour change programmes.

Read the report.

New FRS: Henry Snaith and Ben Davis

1 May 2015

Congratulations to two of our outstanding energy researchers: Henry Snaith and Ben Davis were elected to the Fellowship and Foreign Membership of the Royal Society.

SnaithProfessor Henry Snaith has pioneered the development of hybrid materials for energy and photovoltaics through an interdisciplinary combination of materials synthesis, device development, advanced optoelectronic characterisations and theoretical studies. He has created new materials with advanced functionality and enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms. His recent discovery of extremely efficient thin-film solar cells manufactured from organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has reset aspirations within the photovoltaics community. His work has started a new filed of research, attracting both academic and industrial following, propelled by the prospect of delivering a higher efficiency photovoltaic technology at a much lower cost than existing silicon PV.

Ben DavisProfessor Ben Davis is noted for his chemical interrogation and manipulation of biological systems, particularly those that hinge on carbohydrates and proteins. He has developed selective and benign bond forming strategies that have been applied to biology, allowing the construction of synthetic biomolecules and bioconjugates; the creation of synthetic cells and viruses; and in vivo chemistry. These have enabled associated mechanistic details of protein and sugar biology to be elucidated and exploited for biotechnological applications.

The Future of Nuclear Power in the UK

reportSixty leading experts from industry, academia and politics met in London in March 2015 on the invitation of the Director of Energy Research at the University of Oxford, Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith, to debate the future of nuclear power in the UK. In the light of cross-party consensus on the need for nuclear, the discussion focussed on how a nuclear programme could be delivered successfully and at acceptable cost.

Read a summary report

View introductory slides by Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith.

Grid and Supergrid – designing an electrical future

10 March, 5pm

Eddie O’Connor

Eddie is co-founder and chief executive of Mainstream Renewable Power and founder of Airtricity. He is an Honorary Director of the European Wind Energy Association and is widely know as the ‘father of the super grid’. Hear his inspirational talk, read his transcript and view the slides.

slides

EddieOConnor

 

 

More about energy colloquia.

Can electrochemical energy storage save renewables?

3 March, 5pm

Prof Peter Bruce, FRS

PeterBruce_Slidebruce

View the Slides

Climate change: what science and the IPCC report has to say

5 February 2015

Energy and Green Growth

17 February 2015

Energy and Green Growth

View the slides.
Hepburn_SlideCameron Hepburn
 
See more energy colloquia
 

Future Nuclear – do we need Generation IV or Fusion?

10 February 2015

Future Nuclear – do we need Generation IV or Fusion?

View the slides.
Slides_CowleyCowley
 
See more energy colloquia
 

OIES named ‘top Energy and Resource Think Tank in the world’ (again)

23 January 2015

The Oxford Institute for Energy Studies has for the second year running been named the top Energy and Resource Think Tank in the world by the University of Pennsylvania’s annual think tank report.

Top Energy and Resource Policy Think Tanks
Table 17

1. Oxford Institute for Energy Studies (OIES) (United Kingdom)

2. World Resource Institute (WRI) (United States)
3. Institute of Energy Economics (IEEJ) (Japan)
4. James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy (United States)
5. RAND Corporation (United States)
6. Center for Science of Environment, Resources, and Energy (Japan)
7. TERI: The Energy and Resources Institute (India)
8. Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) (United States)
9. Resoucres for the Future (RFF) (United States)
10. Energy Studies Institute (ESI) (Singapore)

View the full report

Maria van der Hoeven: “Opportunity to act: making smart decisions in a time of low oil prices”

Tuesday, 27 January at 5pm

Opportunity to act: making smart decisions in a time of low oil prices

MvdHoevenMaria van der HoevenExecutive Director, International Energy Agency

See slides, transcript or hear an audio recording.

MariaVanDerHoeven

Maria van der Hoeven took over as Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA) on 1 September 2011. Ms. Van der Hoeven has steered the IEA during a period of exceptional change in the global energy landscape. While the original IEA mandate of energy security remains at the core of the agency’s mission, the IEA has been challenged by rapidly shifting supply/demand balances for oil as well as other major fuels, affecting its members’ interests and also those within the wider global energy economy.

Ms. Van der Hoeven is taking the initiative to address the challenges of global energy governance in the face of changing worldwide requirements. She is determined to strengthen the Agency’s role, enabling it to take the lead in the transition to a secure and sustainable energy future. One of her overarching priorities is implementing a new global engagement strategy to further build and formalise co-operation with the major emerging energy players of the 21st century. Another is expanding modern energy services to the 1.3 billion people worldwide who currently lack them. In recognition of the IEA’s efforts to address the crisis of energy poverty, Ms. Van der Hoeven has been invited to serve on the Advisory Board to the UN Sustainable Energy for All initiative.

Previously, Ms. Van der Hoeven served as Minister of Economic Affairs of the Netherlands from February 2007 to October 2010, during which time she demonstrated leadership on energy policy at the national, regional and global levels.

Carbon Capture and Storage

25 Nov 2014

Linking the IPCC and the UNFCC: carbon capture and storage

Professor Stuart Haszeldine: SCCS and UKCCSRC, University of Edinburgh

Slides available here: pdf_icon

Abstract

CCS is a popular political choice, when listing a menu of actions to reduce carbon emissions. Why then, has progress been so slow? The EU 2030 Climate and Energy package agreements, are re-enforced by the IPCC Summary in AR5, the November USA-China deal, and the November G20 statement. Does this now create a path towards future implementation? CCS projects are starting to emerge globally (22 large-scale projects operating or under construction), Boundary Dam in Canada opening in 2014, two expected in USA, and two in Canada during 2015. In 2018 Peterhead in Scotland will operate as a retrofit on gas combustion; but not until 2023 for Drax/White Rose co-funded by the EU under NER300. Two EEPR projects from the EU are struggling for finances: ROAD in Netherlands and Don Valley in the UK.

Capture of CO2 is currently expensive – although costs are predicted to decrease. Transport is known from decades of safe shipping and pipelines. Storage is well understood from many tens of natural analogues and tens of engineered test injections. Geology beneath the UK North Sea hosts enough storage capacity for more than 100 years of all EU power plant emissions; that is doubled by Norwegian offshore capacity. There is no technical need to wait.

However, despite a technology now regarded as proven, the business implementation of CCS is insufficient. CCS project numbers are about 10x too slow and CO2 storage evaluation is 100x too slow, compared to the IEA 2DS scenario towards 2050. Making profitable business is a problem – for power plant and for industry sites. The USA is using clean environmental legislation. Europe has failed by using a market. Fixing the market firstly requires both an ETS with a sufficiently high and reliable carbon price, and/or sharply focused emission performance standards. Second, political will is needed both at EU and at member state level to provide CCS targets and direct finances for coal and gas CCS plant, to support extra running costs, as is now routine for renewables. That needs to support 10-20 years of learning development and cost reduction.

Two alternatives are possible, to proceed much faster at less cost. First: certificates of carbon extraction could be created, to enforce storage obligations onto hydrocarbon producers. That may be more complex, but smarter, than divestment. Second: captured CO2 can be used for Enhanced Oil Recovery. That would produce taxable profit of many tens Billions. Cost reduction rapidly accelerates through profitable construction of capture plant to provide CO2, leaving an important legacy of operational pipelines connecting onshore sites of emissions to validated storage offshore. Yet UK Government is not negotiating with projects such as Captain Clean Energy – because of Levy Control fears.

 

Short Biography:

Stuart Haszeldine is the world’s first Professor of carbon capture and storage, based at the University of Edinburgh. He trained as a geologist, and has over 35 years research and industry experience in hydrocarbons, energy, and environment. He is now working on carbon management techniques to reduce global (climate) change. He has been, and is, adviser to both UK and Scottish Governments. He is Director of Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage – the UK’s largest university research grouping examining CCS . He is also geological storage leader for the UK CCS Research Centre. He was elected FRSE in 2002, awarded the Geological Society William Smith Medal in 2011, and in 2012 was appointed OBE for services to climate change technologies.

Carbon Capture and Storage

25 Nov 2014

Linking the IPCC and the UNFCC: carbon capture and storage

Professor Stuart Haszeldine: SCCS and UKCCSRC, University of Edinburgh

Slides available here: pdf_icon

Abstract

CCS is a popular political choice, when listing a menu of actions to reduce carbon emissions. Why then, has progress been so slow? The EU 2030 Climate and Energy package agreements, are re-enforced by the IPCC Summary in AR5, the November USA-China deal, and the November G20 statement. Does this now create a path towards future implementation? CCS projects are starting to emerge globally (22 large-scale projects operating or under construction), Boundary Dam in Canada opening in 2014, two expected in USA, and two in Canada during 2015. In 2018 Peterhead in Scotland will operate as a retrofit on gas combustion; but not until 2023 for Drax/White Rose co-funded by the EU under NER300. Two EEPR projects from the EU are struggling for finances: ROAD in Netherlands and Don Valley in the UK.

Capture of CO2 is currently expensive – although costs are predicted to decrease. Transport is known from decades of safe shipping and pipelines. Storage is well understood from many tens of natural analogues and tens of engineered test injections. Geology beneath the UK North Sea hosts enough storage capacity for more than 100 years of all EU power plant emissions; that is doubled by Norwegian offshore capacity. There is no technical need to wait.

However, despite a technology now regarded as proven, the business implementation of CCS is insufficient. CCS project numbers are about 10x too slow and CO2 storage evaluation is 100x too slow, compared to the IEA 2DS scenario towards 2050. Making profitable business is a problem – for power plant and for industry sites. The USA is using clean environmental legislation. Europe has failed by using a market. Fixing the market firstly requires both an ETS with a sufficiently high and reliable carbon price, and/or sharply focused emission performance standards. Second, political will is needed both at EU and at member state level to provide CCS targets and direct finances for coal and gas CCS plant, to support extra running costs, as is now routine for renewables. That needs to support 10-20 years of learning development and cost reduction.

Two alternatives are possible, to proceed much faster at less cost. First: certificates of carbon extraction could be created, to enforce storage obligations onto hydrocarbon producers. That may be more complex, but smarter, than divestment. Second: captured CO2 can be used for Enhanced Oil Recovery. That would produce taxable profit of many tens Billions. Cost reduction rapidly accelerates through profitable construction of capture plant to provide CO2, leaving an important legacy of operational pipelines connecting onshore sites of emissions to validated storage offshore. Yet UK Government is not negotiating with projects such as Captain Clean Energy – because of Levy Control fears.

 

Short Biography:

Stuart Haszeldine is the world’s first Professor of carbon capture and storage, based at the University of Edinburgh. He trained as a geologist, and has over 35 years research and industry experience in hydrocarbons, energy, and environment. He is now working on carbon management techniques to reduce global (climate) change. He has been, and is, adviser to both UK and Scottish Governments. He is Director of Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage – the UK’s largest university research grouping examining CCS . He is also geological storage leader for the UK CCS Research Centre. He was elected FRSE in 2002, awarded the Geological Society William Smith Medal in 2011, and in 2012 was appointed OBE for services to climate change technologies.

Over 10,000 users

November 2014
In less than one year since its creation, energy.ox.ac.uk has attracted over 10,000 unique users and 46,000 page views. Thank you for using this site.

Reasons for optimism: ‘Grid Parity’ for renewable energy sources

28 Oct 2014: Energy Colloquium

Speaker: Chris Goodall

Slides:

pdf_icon

Synopsis

Progress at decarbonisation will speed up. New or improved technologies now offer us cost-competitive routes to low carbon electricity, heat and transport fuel. Solar PV in sunny countries, onshore wind on coasts, biofuels from bacteria, heat from hot rocks and electricity from tidal lagoons are all capable of reducing our dependence on fossil fuels without increasing consumer bills. The critical remaining problem – storing excess energy – will be solved by turning power into methane or hydrogen, thus linking the electricity and gas grids.

The process of reducing fossil fuel use will continue to be difficult – and probably cannot be accomplished without nationalisation of energy distribution. But it can be done, and done quickly, by states that commit themselves to the process of abolishing the existing oligopolistic energy suppliers and replacing them with decentralised power generators offered guaranteed prices. More effort will need to be put into demand management, efficiency improvements and – utterly crucially – reduction in the cost of capital. The rewards for countries that do this early, gaining experience and skills, are likely to be substantial.

This talk will principally cover three topics.

1. what grounds are there for optimism about the progress of technologies
for cheap decarbonisation?
2. how do we solve the storage problem?
3. and how do we build an energy system that is acceptable to electorates in
democratic countries?

Chris Goodall

Chris Goodall is a writer, investor and consultant in low carbon technologies. His four books on energy and climate have won awards and been widely translated. ‘Ten Technologies to Fix Energy and Climate’ was one of the FT’s books of the year. He writes for publication such as the Guardian and the Ecologist and publishes a widely quoted blog at Carbon Commentary.

He helped set up the UK’s first employee-owned solar cooperative, is a seed investor in a new wind turbine company and several other new ventures. He has consulted recently to companies entering the community energy, electric
vehicle charging and tyre recycling businesses. Chris Goodall is a frequent broadcaster and speaker and recently converted a house to Passiv standards.

He has degrees from Cambridge, the University of Michigan and Harvard Business School, where he was a teaching fellow in economics.

Outlook for Nuclear

21 Oct 2014

Tony Roulstone,

Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge.

Though it has taken more than eight years from the first indications that new nuclear build in the UK would be welcomed, the prospects for nuclear within a broad energy strategy now look very promising. The talk discusses these plans and the uncertainties for nuclear both in the UK and in other countries around the world, based on common needs to: address climate change, have stable costs and secure energy supplies.

New nuclear development is also stimulating different reactor designs to: burn nuclear waste and reduce costs using smaller simpler reactors.

Slides available here: pdf_icon

Short Biography:

Tony Roulstone established and teaches on the Nuclear Energy masters programme at the University of Cambridge. He has research interests in the economics and the safety of nuclear power. He is also a visiting Professor of Nuclear Engineering at City University in Hong Kong.

He received his engineering degree from the University of Cambridge and has spent much of his career in the nuclear and aerospace industries, starting with UKAEA working on fast reactor systems and including 20 years at Rolls-Royce, where he became Managing Director of the Nuclear Group. Earlier he was the nuclear engineering director when the Vanguard nuclear submarines were being designed and delivered. Also, he has held senior engineering and corporate transformation roles in Rolls-Royce plc.

He provides consultancy widely in the engineering, technology and services sectors and has completed several policy studies on stimulating enterprise and on large scale procurement.

He is a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and a Member of both the Nuclear Institute and the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

Can Future Energy Needs be Met Sustainably?

14 October 2014
The introductory lecture to the Energy Colloquium, Michealmas term 2014, was given by Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith, Director of Energy Research at the University of Oxford.

Slides are available for download here.

Abstract

In order to allow everyone on the planet to lead decent lives, global energy use will have to increase substantially. The need can be met with fossil fuels for the foreseeable future, but this is not sustainable. Decarbonisation is vital to mitigate climate change and reduce air pollution (estimated to cause 10% of all deaths), and because in the (very) long run fossil fuels will become increasingly scarce and expensive. Lower carbon pathways and realistic energy projections are diverging, and it has become clear that major decarbonisation is not possible with existing technologies at a price society would be prepared to pay. I will review the current situation, and the steps that need to be taken to increase the chance that future energy needs can be met sustainably. They include driving down the cost of low carbon technologies (CCS, nuclear, solar, bioenergy,…), managing demand and improving efficiency (big potential gains are not being realised), and putting a price on carbon.

Speaker Biography

Chris Llewellyn Smith is Director of Energy Research, Oxford University, and President of the Council of SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East).  He has chaired the Council of ITER, directed the UK’s fusion programme, and served as Provost and President of University College London and Director General of CERN (1994-1998, when the Large Hadron Collider was approved and construction started).  He has written and spoken widely on science funding, international scientific collaboration and energy issues, and served on numerous advisory bodies including the UK Prime Minister’s Advisory Council on Science and Technology. His scientific contributions to theoretical high energy physics and leadership have been recognised by awards and honours world-wide.

Horizon 2020 Energy – slides available

1 Oct 14

Kerry Young and Helen Fairclough from EU Energy Focus presented valuable information on Horizon 2020 Energy calls and priorities.

Slide are now available for download.

Contact details

0845 6000 430

mail@euenergyfocus.co.uk

www.euenergyfocus.co.uk

Who should decide the evolution of the energy mix in a central buyer model?

Will the future energy mix be decided by government or markets? Leading representatives from government, regulators, industry and academia debated the future of electricity markets as part of an Oxford Energy event at the House of Lords. An introduction by Professor Cameron Hepburn was followed by an open discussion under the Chatham House Rule.

A summary of the meeting is available for downloaded.

  • Cameron Hepburn’s introduction: “Who should decide the evolution of the energy mix in a central buyer model?” (slides) Hepburn_slide
  • Meeting summary

pendulum

Rocket science leads to 40% more efficient pans

July 2014
Oxford research into high-efficiency cooling systems for next-generation jet-engines has led to a new design of cooking pan that uses 40% less energy.

FlarePan

Read more and see Thomas Povey talk about his invention.

Oxford researchers announce potential game changer in the use of hydrogen as a “green” fuel.

June 2014: A new discovery by scientists at the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), offers a viable solution to the challenges of storage and cost by using ammonia as a clean and secure hydrogen-containing energy source to produce hydrogen on-demand in situ.

Journal of the American Chemical Society have selected this as an Editors’ choice paper so it will be freely available for downloading.

 

ja-2014-042836_0005

Transformative Change conference slides

The 3rd annual Oxford Energy Conference attracted over 200 participants and heard from leading thinkers about Transformative Change in Energy. Slides are now available here.

16 June: New Oxford Energy Newsletter

cover

In this issue:
– Henry Snaith – one of ten people who mattered in 2013
– How Formula 1 technology can make cars more fuel efficient
– Border Carbon Adjustments – can it avoid carbon leakage?
– How much power has the Pentland Firth to offer?
– Shale gas – is it being overhyped?

Download the latest Oxford Energy newsletter

NEW BOOK: “Nature in the Balance”

The Economics of Biodiversity

Edited with Dieter Helm & Cameron Hepburn (January 2014) Oxford University Press: www.oup.com/uk/isbn/9780199676880.

 

NatureInBalance

Oxford MBA graduates secure $20m funding to light up a million homes in Kenya

A team of Oxford MBA graduates have secured $20m in follow-on funding for their social venture M-KOPA Solar, whose solar home systems are sold to off-grid households in Kenya on an affordable 12-month mobile money payment plan.

Read more

OIES named top Energy and Resource Policy Think Tank in the world

6 Feb 14
Oxford Institute for Energy Studies has been named the top Energy and Resource Policy Think Tank in the world by the University of Pennsylvania’s annual think tank report. gotothinktank.com/rankings/

George Osborne visits Oxford Photovoltaics

January 2014
Chancellor George Osborne has announced £30m of Government funding as part of a total investment of £67m in four innovation centres across Oxfordshire.
Read more here.

Beware of shale gas hype warn senior stakeholders

January 2014
A gathering of senior representatives of the oil and gas industry, energy companies, finance, parliament, government, and other organi- sations and stakeholders, is cautious about direct comparisons with US shale gas develop- ments and about the impact of UK shale on gas prices. Participants warned that the impacts of fracking need to be communicated openly, to dampen overblown expectations and avoid brand damage to the industry.

Read the Meeting Summary.

OxfordEnergy_ShaleGasMeeting

Energy Minister gets the first Oxford Energy Newsletter

BarkerEnergyWebsite

Greg Barker MP receives the first Oxford Energy Newsletter when visiting the Environmental Change Institute.

120 environmental science studentships

Oxford University is set to benefit from a £10 million investment in a new environmental science training programme, leading one of 15 Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs) across the country.

Over the next five years, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) will fund 120 full studentships at Oxford University.

Read more

Major Advance for an Emerging Solar Cell Technology

Following a 2012 ‘breakthrough for perovskite cells’ by Oxford physicist Henry Snaith and colleagues, Science (11/9/13) reported that Henry and his team ‘have delivered another surprise….the cells are just as efficient if constructed using the same method as cheap thin-film silicon cells. What’s more, the simple layered cell converts more than 15% of sunlight to electricity – equal to the record for perovskite cells, set just two months ago for a nanostructured device’.

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be

Joerg Friedrichs

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be: Climate Change and Energy Scarcity
by Jörg Friedrichs
MIT Press

Oxford Institute for Energy Studies among best in the world

The Oxford Institute for Energy Studies was rated the second best Energy and Resource Policy Think Tank in the world in a survey by the University of Pennsylvania published in January 2013.

UK Energy Policy Day

31 May 2013: Sir Chris Llewellyn-Smith organised a one-day conference to discuss energy policy. The presentations made during the day are available to download here.